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Subject: [redesastres-l] Obituary: Paul Nicoletti
Date: Tue, 1 Mar 2016 20:31:06 +0100
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Por la relevancia de este científico estadounidense en su lucha contra la
brucelosis, les envío el obituario, saludos
OBITUARY: PAUL NICOLETTI
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Date: 26 Feb 2016
From: Mo Salmon <
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Dr. Paul Nicoletti was a veterinary epidemiologist who spent the bulk of his
career with the USDA and the University of Florida's College of Veterinary
Medicine. Nicoletti made significant contributions to US animal health by
improving the procedures used to control bovine brucellosis, most notably,
he was the driving force behind the investigation and ultimate
implementation of adult vaccination for brucellosis. It was only through
adult vaccination that the U.S.
ultimately arrived at brucellosis free status. He was an internationally
recognized authority on bovine brucellosis.
Dr, Nicoletti's students benefited immensely from his repeated admonitions
to question everything, to be wary of assumptions, and to focus on disease
prevention.
Nicoletti was born in 1932 in Goodman, Missouri and grew up on a small dairy
farm. He graduated from the University of Missouri's College of Veterinary
Medicine in 1956. In 1962, he earned a master's degree from the University
of Wisconsin, where he wrote his thesis on brucellosis.
>From 1962 to 1968, Nicoletti worked as a USDA regional epidemiologist
in Albany, New York. In this capacity, he began conducting field
investigations of brucellosis. From 1968 to 1972, he served in Iran as a
veterinary epidemiologist consultant for the United Nations Food and
Agriculture Organization. He then returned to the United States and to his
work as a regional epidemiologist with the USDA. In 1975, he was transferred
to Gainesville, Florida, where his focus was once again on brucellosis. In
1978, Nicoletti joined the faculty at the University of Florida's College of
Veterinary Medicine, where he taught courses in infectious diseases,
epidemiology, public health, and food safety.
He influenced many young veterinary students to consider careers in
agriculture and public health.
Nicoletti was a member of the American Association of Bovine Practitioners,
the Florida Cattlemen's Association, and the American Association of Food
Hygiene Veterinarians. He was a past president of the American Veterinary
Medical Association, the American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine,
the Florida Veterinary Medical Association, the Alachua County Veterinary
Medical Association, and Animal Disease Research Workers in the Southern
States.
Over the course of his long and distinguished career, Nicoletti received
numerous awards and honors. In 1994 he was named Veterinarian of the Year by
the Florida Veterinary Medical Association, and in 2003, he was presented
with the Distinguished Service Award by the University of Florida's College
of Veterinary Medicine. His most prestigious award came in 2010 when he was
recognized with the Meyer-Steele Gold Head Cane Award, the highest honor of
the American Veterinary Epidemiology Society. This award recognizes
scientists who have significantly advanced human health through the practice
of veterinary epidemiology and public health. Dr. Nicoletti retired from the
University of Florida in 2003. He has 2 grown daughters, Julie and Nancy.
--
Mo Salman
Animal Population Health Institute - Colorado State University
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[Paul is possibly best remembered for his aggressive attitude to bovine
brucellosis. The large commercial bovine dairy herds in Florida were
severely afflicted with this disease in spite of the control programme. And
in some ways, this programme made the situation worse as progress could be
very slow with multiple tests each year. Against the instructions of his
bosses, in the late 1970s, he initiated an adult vaccination programme using
S19, and the disease stopped in Florida.
A few years later, from 1980-82, I was involved with Fred Enright in a
similar trial in the Louisiana Gulf Coast ranges beef herds using diluted
(1/24) S19 vaccine on adult beef cattle. These herds are only worked twice a
year, in the spring and fall, I well remember going out to at least 3
meetings at local high schools called by our Agriculture Commissioner, Bob
Odom, who preached to his ranchers like some evangelical minister about how
they must join this new calf and adult vaccination programme. We had a
number of herds that had been decimated by reactor culling at least 3 times;
he asked that ranchers with reactors should stand up. They did, and there
were many; over 50 percent of these coastal range herds were under
quarantine, overall with an 8 percent prevalence. Once started, we found
that new reactors stopped appearing after some 6-plus months. The disease
was no longer contagious, and in 4 herds where reactors were allowed to
remain, it made no statistical difference though much appreciated by the
owners.
The dilute S19 only produced a temporary titre in the cows, and after some
6-plus months the true reactors still had high titres, differentiating them
from the temporary false reactors produced by the adult S19 vaccination.
True reactors were identified with an "R" brand and were under a convenience
culling order, e.g., to be sold for slaughter at the annual herd culling,
which made life much easier for the ranchers. In 2 years, these herds were
free of brucellosis, and we were enjoying its eradication. A more suitable
RS 55 vaccine took over, and we were ready for a successful national
eradication programme. We are not there yet, as reactors are still appearing
sporadically in Montana and Wyoming, claimed to be as a result of a
reservoir in wildlife. - Mod.MHJ
A HealthMap/ProMED-mail map can be accessed at:
<http://healthmap.org/promed/p/106>.]
January 18, 2021. Centro Nacional de Sanidad Agropecuaria, webmaster@censa.edu.cu .