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Subject: [redesastres-l] Sospecha de microcefalias asociadas a Zika como consecuencia del empleo de insecticidas
Date: Mon, 15 Feb 2016 16:16:59 -0500
From: Pastor Alfonso < Esta dirección de correo electrónico está protegida contra spambots. Usted necesita tener Javascript activado para poder verla. >;
To: 'Redesastres L' < Esta dirección de correo electrónico está protegida contra spambots. Usted necesita tener Javascript activado para poder verla. >;

 

Se valoran sospechas de microcefalias en bebe producto del uso de uno de los insecticidas para combatire mosquitos.

Pastor

Argentine and Brazilian doctors suspect mosquito insecticide as cause of microcephaly


Claire Robinson / GMWatch10th February 2016With the proposed connection between the Zika virus and Brazil's outbreak of microcephaly in new born babies looking increasingly tenuous, Latin American doctors are proposing another possible cause: Pyriproxyfen, a pesticide used in Brazil since 2014 to arrest the development of mosquito larvae in drinking water tanks. Might the 'cure' in fact be the poison?Malformations detected in thousands of children from pregnant women living in areas where the Brazilian state added Pyriproxyfen to drinking water are not a coincidence, even though the Ministry of Health places direct blame on the Zika virus.
The World Health Organization view that the microcephaly outbreak in Brazil's impoverished northeast is caused by the Zika virus has, so far, received few challenges.Brazil's Health Minister, Marcelo Castro, has gone so far as to say that he has "100% certainty" that there is a link between Zika and microcephaly, a birth defect in which babies are born with small heads.The view is widely supported in the medical community worldwide, including by the US's influential Center for Disease Control. But there is no hard evidence of the link, rather a mixture of epidemiological indications and circumstantial evidence.Argentine and Brazilian doctors suspect mosquito insecticide as cause of microcephaly
Claire Robinson / GMWatch10th February 2016
The New York Times also reported on 3rd February on the outcome of analyses by Brazil's Health Ministry: "Of the cases examined so far, 404 have been confirmed as having microcephaly. Only 17 of them tested positive for the Zika virus. But the government and many researchers say that number may be largely irrel

 

August 13, 2020. Centro Nacional de Sanidad Agropecuaria, webmaster@censa.edu.cu .